Foreach loop Internals


A Foreach loop automatically produces a Cast to the object you pass. So its sometimes irrelevant to use var inside foreach loop.
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Javascript Alert in C#


Code:

/// 

/// A JavaScript alert 

/// 

public static class Alert

{

    /// 

    /// Shows a client-side JavaScript alert in the browser.
    /// 


    /// The message to appear in the alert.

    public static void Show(string message)

    {

        // Cleans the message to allow single quotation marks

        string cleanMessage = message.Replace(“‘”“\\'”);
        string script = string.Format(“$(document).ready(function(){alert(‘{0}’);});”, cleanMessage);

        
// Gets the executing web page

        Page page = HttpContext.Current.CurrentHandler as Page;

        
// Checks if the handler is a Page and that the script isn’t all ready on the Page

        if (page != null && !page.ClientScript.IsClientScriptBlockRegistered(“alert”))

        {

            page.ClientScript.RegisterClientScriptBlock(typeof(Alert), “alert”, script);

        }

    }

}

Session Helper Class (Facade)


                                                         
Code:
 using System.Web;
///

/// Static Session facade class
///

public static class SessionHelper
{
# region Private Constants
private const string userId = “UserId”;
private const string projectId = “ProjectId”;
# endregion
#region Private Static Member Variables
private static HttpContext thisContext;
#endregion
#region Public Static Methods
///

/// Clears Session
///

public static void ClearSession()
{
HttpContext.Current.Session.Clear();
}
///

/// Abandons Session
///

public static void Abandon()
{
ClearSession();
HttpContext.Current.Session.Abandon();
}
#endregion
#region Public Static Properties
///

/// Gets/Sets Session for UserId
///

public static string UserId
{
get
{
if (HttpContext.Current.Session[userId] == null)
return “”;
else
return HttpContext.Current.Session[userId].ToString();
}
set { HttpContext.Current.Session[userId] = value; }
}
public static string ProjectId
{
get
{
if (HttpContext.Current.Session[projectId] == null)
return “”;
else
return HttpContext.Current.Session[projectId].ToString();
}
set { HttpContext.Current.Session[projectId] = value; }
}
#endregion
}
//Use as: SessionHelper.UserId=”user1″;
//        string user=SessionHelper.UserId;
//        SessionHelper.Abandon();

Use the ENUM object to manipulate Enumerated Values


Enums are a tremendously easy way to make your code understandable. In the bad old days, when working on someone else’s program I’d be forced to decode code like this:
Dim cust As New Customer
cust.Type = 0
With an Enum, everything is more obvious:
Dim cust As New Customer
cust.Type = CustomerTypes.Deadbeat
What takes Enums to the next level are the static methods built into the Enum class. For instance, if I want to turn an Enum into an array of strings, I can use the Enum class’s GetNames method:
Dim cTypes As String() = [Enum].GetNames(GetType(CustomerTypes))
Because of the way Visual Basic handles names, Enum has to be enclosed in brackets to prevent syntax errors. C# doesn’t require those brackets:
string[] cTypes = Enum.GetNames(typeof(CustomerTypes));
I can then bind the output from GetNames to any listing control to get a list of the names in the Enum displayed in my user interface:
MyListBox.ItemsSource = Enum.GetNames(typeof(CustomerTypes));
GetNames shows the basic structure of the Enum class’s static methods: the first parameter to any method is always the Type of the Enum you want to work with. For instance, if you have code in a Web Service that’s passed the value of an Enum, you can convert that value into the name of the corresponding Enum entry using the Enum class’s GetName method. As before, the first parameter is the type of the Enum; the second parameter is the value you’re looking up:
Dim inputValue As Integer = 1
Me.MyTextBox.Text = [Enum].GetName(GetType(CustomerTypes), inputValue)
Parse goes one better and converts a string containing one of the names in an Enum into the Enum item itself. This code, for instance, sets the Customer object’s Type property to the appropriate Enum item based on a string value:
Dim custTypeString As String = "DeadBeat"
cust.Type = [Enum].Parse(
GetType(CustomerTypes), custTypeString);
Visual Basic doesn’t require the explicit cast to use Parse:
string custTypeString = "DeadBeat";
cust.Type = (CustomerTypes) Enum.Parse(
typeof(CustomerTypes), custTypeString);
If the string value you’re passing to Parse isn’t an item in the Enum, the Parse method throws an exception. To avoid that, you can use the Enum’s TryParse method which, while it still won’t do the conversion, won’t throw an exception either. An even better answer is to use the Enum’s IsDefined method to see if the item exists before trying to retrieve it:
if (Enum.IsDefined(typeof(CustomersType), custTypeString))
{
Customers ctype = (CustomersType) Enum.Parse(
typeof(CustomersType), custTypeString);
}
else
{
ErrorLabel.Text = "Not a valid customer type.";
}
(Taken from a blog.)

Features Added in Different Version of .Net Framework


.Net Framework 1.0 – This is the first version of .Net Framework that was released by Microsoft.

.Net Framework 1.1 – This is the 2nd major release of .Net Framework release by Microsoft. In this release it supports mobile ASP.Net controls, ODBC and Oracle Database. It also provides support for Internet Protocol version 6(I0v6).

.Net Framework 2.0 – It is part of Visual Studio 2005 and Microsoft SQL Server 2005. .Net Framework 2. Was the latest version of .Net Framework that has support Windows 2000.Net Framework 2.0 has many changes and enhancements as compared to ,Net Framework 1.1. It has a number of application programming interface changes. It contains many new personalization features for ASP.Net, for example, support for themes, skins, and web parts.

.Net Framework 3.0 – It uses the CLR version of 2.0. It contains a set of managed code APIs that form an integral part of Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008. .Net Framework 3.0 uses the same version of CLR that was incorporated with .Net Framework 2.0. It includes some new features as follows:
  1. Windows Presentation Foundation
  2. Windows Communication Foundation
  3. Windows Workflow Foundation
  4. Windows CardSpace
·.Net Framework 3.5 – .Net Framework 3.5 also uses the CLR version 2.0. In this release it supports LINQ, extension methods, lambda expression, anonymous types and built in Ajax support.

·.Net Framework 4.0 – In this release it supports PLINQ and Task Parallel Library. It supports Code Contracts and provides new types to work with arbitrary-precision arithmetic.

ASP.Net Grid View Sorting using jQuery



The Article explains how to implement Sorting in Asp.Net Grid View using jQuery,
Just open the solution, and you’ll get to see the js file used to perform sorting on the GridView we have in Asp.Net aspx page.


The sorting is done on the basis of css class names provided in Style.css.
Just run the solution, and you’ll get to see that grid is sorted on the basis of string, date and numbers as well.

You can implement and extend this solution in your existing/new website.

Happy Coding J.

CRUD Operations using AutoMapper in C# MVC Application


Download Source Code         

Introduction:

 
In our article series of Learning MVC, we learnt a lot about MVC, about various techniques to communicate to database in MVC applications, and few internal concepts too.
When we indulge into realtime programming environment, we face not only one but many type of challenges in the code.My this article explains a new concept Auto Mapper in MVC application to overcome one of the major challenge we face while communicating with data entities and binding them to our model.
Challenge:
Sometimes while interacting with real time(database) entities and binding our model to them, we end up in a situation like,
var dbContext = new MyDBDataContext();
var userDetails = dbContext.Users.FirstOrDefault(userId => userId.UserId == id);
var user = newLearningMVC.Models.User();
            if (userDetails != null)
            {
                user.UserId = userDetails.UserId;
                user.FirstName = userDetails.FirstName;
                user.LastName = userDetails.LastName;
                user.Address = userDetails.Address;
                user.PhoneNo = userDetails.PhoneNo;
                user.EMail = userDetails.EMail;
                user.Company = userDetails.Company;
                user.Designation = userDetails.Designation;
            }
 return View(user);
The above mentioned code is not very hard to understand ,In the above code, an instance var dbContext = new MyDBDataContext(); is created from a LinqTOSql Context class, there after user details from a Users specific table have been fetched and stored in var userDetails variable.We had an existing model named User(LearningMVC.Models.User()), that has similar properties as that of Users class generated from database, now we initialize properties of instance of our model from properties of instance of User class from database, so that we can populate our View in a MVC application.
We see here there are 8 properties that are similar to each other but each set lies in separate class, one in Model, and one in Users class.And what we do is one by one we bind these properties to our model and pass it to View.Now problem is what if we have 100 column records coming from database, and also our model have same no. of properties, and the code has to be repeated 6-7 times at different scenarios, now do we still follow such strategy of binding each property from db to model, trust me the code will be 100 pages large, and will be charging 5 times the effort just to bind the model from domain entities.
To overcome this tedious situation AutoMapper is introduced.It not only reduces the effort, but also limits the execution time that has been taken by such a large no. of lines to execute.
Auto Mapper:
AutoMapper is a open source provided in GitHub.
As per the AutoMapper CodePlex web page  “AutoMapper is an object-object mapper. Object-object mapping works by transforming an input object of one type into an output object of a different type. What makes AutoMapper interesting is that it provides some interesting conventions to take the dirty work out of figuring out how to map type A to type B. As long as type B follows AutoMapper’s established conventions, almost zero configuration is needed to map two types.” therefore, it provides the solution for our mapping issue.
                   

 

Install AutoMapper:
Firstly install the NuGet Package Manager in your Visual Studio IDE. Once done,go to
Tools -> Library Packet Manager -> Packet manager Console
Then in the console window opened at bottom of Visual Studio, type:
PM> Install-Package AutoMapper
Press Enter, this will install AutoMapper and when next time you open MVC application in Visual Studio , it will automatically add dll reference to project.
AutoMapper in Action:
Lets Create an MVC application first, you can create an MVC application, and connect it with database using LINQ to SQl following my article http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/620197/Learning-MVC-Part-2-Creating-MVC-Application-and-P
I have also attached the code of Existing MVC application used without AutoMapper.
Now let’s evaluate all the Controller Actions one by one and convert the code using AutoMapper.
Step1: Create database for existing application, the databse script is attached with the source code,
Open Existing MVC Application in Visual Studio,
See that AutoMapper is referenced in project, now use that namespace in MyController,as,
 
Step2: Index Action:
In the very first Action of our controller MyController(Can be found under Controllers folder), Index Action, we see the code,
public ActionResultIndex()
        {
            var dbContext = new MyDBDataContext();
            var userList = fromuser in dbContext.Users select user;
            var users = new List<LearningMVC.Models.User>();
            if (userList.Any())
            {
                foreach (varuser in userList)
                {
                    users.Add(new LearningMVC.Models.User()
                        {
                            UserId = user.UserId,
                            Address = user.Address,
                            Company = user.Company,
                            FirstName = user.FirstName,
                            LastName = user.LastName,
                            Designation = user.Designation,
                            EMail = user.EMail,
                            PhoneNo = user.PhoneNo
                        });
                }
            }
         
            return View(users);
        }
Now where will AutoMapper fit in here, you know that, it will be used to replace the property mapping done one by one in the code, therefore,
Just at the first line of code, define a AutoMap,
To create the default mapping, call the Mapper.CreateMap() with proper types. In this case, T1 will be LearningMVC.Userand T2 will be LearningMVC.Models.User
Mapper.CreateMap<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>();
LearningMVC.User -> DTO Object Class
LearningMVC.Models.User -> Model Class to bind the View
So, here we define a mapping between, DTO and Model class with the help of AutoMapper class.
Now inside foreach loop, replace the whole code by,
LearningMVC.Models.UseruserModel = Mapper.Map<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>(user);
users.Add(userModel);
Finally call the Mapper.Map(obj1) to get the mapped object of T2.
So, our final Action code,
  public ActionResultIndex()
        {
            Mapper.CreateMap<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>();
            var dbContext = new MyDBDataContext();
            var userList = fromuser in dbContext.Users select user;
            var users = new List<LearningMVC.Models.User>();
            if (userList.Any())
            {
                foreach (varuser in userList)
                {
                    LearningMVC.Models.User userModel = Mapper.Map<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>(user);
                    users.Add(userModel);
                }
            }
         
            return View(users);
        }
 We see now, we escaped that boring work of matching properties one by one.Now run the application, and you’ll see the application running as before.
Step 3: Details Action:
Existing Code
public ActionResultDetails(int? id)
        {
            var dbContext = new MyDBDataContext();
            var userDetails = dbContext.Users.FirstOrDefault(userId => userId.UserId == id);
            var user = newLearningMVC.Models.User();
            if (userDetails != null)
            {
                user.UserId = userDetails.UserId;
                user.FirstName = userDetails.FirstName;
                user.LastName = userDetails.LastName;
                user.Address = userDetails.Address;
                user.PhoneNo = userDetails.PhoneNo;
                user.EMail = userDetails.EMail;
                user.Company = userDetails.Company;
                user.Designation = userDetails.Designation;
            }
            return View(user);
        }
New Code with AutoMapper
public ActionResultDetails(int? id)
        {
            var dbContext = new MyDBDataContext();
            Mapper.CreateMap<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>();
            var userDetails = dbContext.Users.FirstOrDefault(userId => userId.UserId == id);
            LearningMVC.Models.User user = Mapper.Map<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>(userDetails);
            return View(user);
        }
Step4: Create Action (POST)
Existing Code
[HttpPost]
        public ActionResultCreate(LearningMVC.Models.User userDetails)
        {
            try
            {
                var dbContext = newMyDBDataContext();
                var user = newUser();
                if (userDetails != null)
                {
                    user.UserId = userDetails.UserId;
                    user.FirstName = userDetails.FirstName;
                    user.LastName = userDetails.LastName;
                    user.Address = userDetails.Address;
                    user.PhoneNo = userDetails.PhoneNo;
                    user.EMail = userDetails.EMail;
                    user.Company = userDetails.Company;
                    user.Designation = userDetails.Designation;
                }
                dbContext.Users.InsertOnSubmit(user);
                dbContext.SubmitChanges();
                return RedirectToAction(“Index”);
            }
            catch
            {
                return View();
            }
        }
New Code with AutoMapper
[HttpPost]
        public ActionResultCreate(LearningMVC.Models.User userDetails)
        {
            try
            {
                Mapper.CreateMap<LearningMVC.Models.User, LearningMVC.User>();
                var dbContext = newMyDBDataContext();
                varuser = Mapper.Map<LearningMVC.Models.User, LearningMVC.User>(userDetails);
                dbContext.Users.InsertOnSubmit(user);
                dbContext.SubmitChanges();
                return RedirectToAction(“Index”);
            }
            catch
            {
                return View();
            }
        }
Note that, in here we interchanged the mapping, because now we had to read from Model and bind to our DTO fror Create Action, so just interchange the mapping, and run the application,Now our T1 is Model and T2 is DTO.
Step5: Edit Action:
Existing Code
  public ActionResultEdit(int? id)
        {
            var dbContext = new MyDBDataContext();
            var userDetails = dbContext.Users.FirstOrDefault(userId => userId.UserId == id);
            var user = newLearningMVC.Models.User();
            if (userDetails != null)
            {
                user.UserId = userDetails.UserId;
                user.FirstName = userDetails.FirstName;
                user.LastName = userDetails.LastName;
                user.Address = userDetails.Address;
                user.PhoneNo = userDetails.PhoneNo;
                user.EMail = userDetails.EMail;
                user.Company = userDetails.Company;
                user.Designation = userDetails.Designation;
            }
            return View(user);
        }
New Code with AutoMapper
public ActionResultEdit(int? id)
        {
            Mapper.CreateMap<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>();
            var dbContext = new MyDBDataContext();
            var userDetails = dbContext.Users.FirstOrDefault(userId => userId.UserId == id);
            var user = Mapper.Map<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>(userDetails)
            return View(user);
        }
Step6: Delete Action:
Existing Code
public ActionResultDelete(int? id)
        {
            var dbContext = new MyDBDataContext();
            var user = newLearningMVC.Models.User();
            var userDetails = dbContext.Users.FirstOrDefault(userId => userId.UserId == id);
            if (userDetails != null)
            {
                user.FirstName = userDetails.FirstName;
                user.LastName = userDetails.LastName;
                user.Address = userDetails.Address;
                user.PhoneNo = userDetails.PhoneNo;
                user.EMail = userDetails.EMail;
                user.Company = userDetails.Company;
                user.Designation = userDetails.Designation;
            }
            returnView(user);
        }
New Code using AutoMapper
public ActionResultDelete(int? id)
        {
            var dbContext = new MyDBDataContext();
            Mapper.CreateMap<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>();
            var userDetails = dbContext.Users.FirstOrDefault(userId => userId.UserId == id);
            var user = Mapper.Map<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>(userDetails);
            return View(user);
        }
 ForMember() and MapFrom() in AutoMapper:
 The two important functions in AutoMapper play an important role in object mapping, Suppose our model/viewmodel class have a property as FullName, and from the DTO we want to add the FirstName and Last Name of the user to make it a full name nad bind it to model,to overcome these kind of scenarios ForMember() and MapFrom() come in action,See below code,
Mapper.CreateMap<LearningMVC.User, LearningMVC.Models.User>().ForMember(emp => emp.Fullname,
                            map => map.MapFrom(p => p.FirstName + ” “+ p.LastName));
Here we are saying that ForMember FullName in our model class, map properties from FirstName and LastName of User DTO.
The code is itself self explanatory.
This kind of mapping is also called Custom Mapping.
Conclusion:
In this article we learnt how to do custom mapping and entity to entity mapping with the help of AutoMapper. Since this was just a glimpse of the concept there is lot more to explore in this topic in detail.
I have skipped the POST methods for Edit and Delete, this will be a kind of homework for you. Once you completely follow and understand, you can easily complete those two pending Actions as well.Let me see the source code J as well.